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Renters Insurance Quotes in Bradenton, FL

Jackie Hogan, Agent

941-896-9810

5253 33rd Street East
Bradenton, FL  34203
Fax : 941-896-9811

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Renters Insurance BradentonRenter's Insurance

You do not have to own your property for it to be considered your home in Bradenton. It is often your possessions that are more treasured than the house, especially when renting.

While the landlord may have home insurance covering the structure, your personal belongings are not covered unless you have a renter’s insurance policy in place.

GreatFlorida Insurance has budget friendly renter’s coverage to protect against damage or theft of your small appliances, electronics, computer and entertainment equipment, clothes, shoes, jewelry, furniture, bikes and just about anything else you own.

Renter’s insurance is not only created for your possessions but, can offer protection if someone is injured at your rental property as well as  provide living expenses if your rental is damaged and you need to find temporary housing.

GreatFlorida Insurance can cover your rental property whether you live in a condominium, apartment, townhouse or home in Bradenton. Safeguard your personal effects with renter’s insurance today.

Protect What's Yours with Renter's Insurance

Whether you own or rent your home, the fact remains that you want to protect your belongings and your family from life's unfortunate events.

While most people have heard of homeowners insurance, many renters don't know that there are special policies just for them called renters insurance.

Contact a GreatFlorida Renter's Insurance Agent in Bradenton to get more information on a renters insurance policies and to get your free renters insurance quote.

Call 941-896-9810 or take a few minutes to complete our online quote request form.

Why should I get a renters insurance policy?

Even though you may be living in a home that is protected by someone else's homeowners insurance policy, you want to be sure that your personal belongings and liabilities are covered.

If an accident, natural disaster or other unfortunate incident occurs, a renters insurance policy will make it easier to get back on your feet.

How do deductibles work with renters insurance?

Just like with other policies, a deductible is the amount that you agree to pay before your insurance policy begins to pay. However, it is important to note that this applies to personal property claims and not to liability claims.

Additionally, hurricane deductibles are applied differently since storms can cause damage multiple times in one year. Your GreatFlorida Insurance Agent in Bradenton can provide you with additional information on how deductibles work.

What personal items does a renters policy cover?

Renters insurance policies are designed to keep your assets safe. Take a look around your home. You probably have more personal property in your home than you initially realize.

Do you have?

  • Kitchen appliances and supplies
  • Electronics
  • Clothes
  • Shoes
  • Jewelry
  • Purses
  • Furniture
  • Entertainment systems

Protect items such as these with a superb renters insurance policy from GreatFlorida Insurance. Get your quote by calling 941-896-9810.

How about protection against personal liability?

When someone is hurt at your home, it may be as much your liability as it is the landlord's liability.

Not having proper coverage in place can be a costly mistake. Renters insurance will give you the protection you need whether you need to cover attorneys' fees or pay for the medical bills of those injured on your property.

Protection at home and away from home.

Damages and personal liability can by incurred whether you're home or away from home. For instance, if you accidentally set something on fire because of a faulty appliance or lapse in judgment, a good renters insurance policy can help you recover from those damages.

On the other hand, if your home catches on fire, suffers from water damage as a result of an action of your neighbor or building management, or is broken into, a renters insurance policy will be your best asset.

In these instances your policy will cover damaged items as well as pay part of your living expenses should you be forced out of your home due to the damage.

Renters insurance covers your belongings from natural disasters.

Florida is the Sunshine State. Our tropical climate draws visitors from around the world. However, it also leaves us susceptible to severe storms, floods, hurricanes, tornados, etc.

When you rent your home, you are not responsible for damage to the structure, but guess who is responsible for your personal belongings. You are.

The destruction of your home and personal belongings can be devastating. Give yourself and your family the best chance for a second start with proper renters insurance coverage.

You'll also ensure that you'll have financial support to pay for living expenses if you are forced out of your home.

Payment plans available.

Renters insurance can fit most any budget. You have the option of paying for the entire year upfront or paying a deposit followed by quarterly payments. Get more information when you contact a GreatFlorida Insurance Agent.

Get started by making a list and checking it twice.

How can you get started? Before calling GreatFlorida Insurance take inventory of your belongings. From furniture to appliances to electronics to clothes to shoes to clothing to jewelry, these costs can really add up.

Once you have an idea of the total value of your belongings, a GreatFlorida Insurance Agent in Bradenton will be able to put together the best possible renters insurance quote for you.

Get a Quote Online
Call 941-896-9810
Florida Renters  Insurance Blog
by GreatFlorida Insurance
7/12/2018

“Fishing, tourism and public health are vulnerable to algae this year in Florida”, observes Ellsworth Buck, Vice President of GreatFlorida Insurance, Florida’s leading independent boat insurance company.

Red Tide

A patchy bloom of the Florida red tide organism, Karenia brevis, persists in Southwest Florida. You might recognize red tide on the beach. It looks like thick mats of smelly, brown, seaweed and covers beaches along Florida’s Atlantic Coast.

Red Tide is a naturally-occurring microscopic alga that has been documented along Florida’s Gulf Coast since the 1840’s and occurs nearly every year. Blooms, or higher than normal concentrations of the Florida red tide alga, Karenia brevis, frequently occur in the Gulf of Mexico, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC).

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), reports some red tide produces toxins that have harmful effects on people, fish, marine mammals and birds. In humans, the toxin can become airborne and varying levels of eye and respiratory irritation can occur, becoming more severe for those with pre-existing respiratory conditions, such as asthma. Even touching the bloom can cause a rash.  MOTE Marine Laboratory & Aquarium issues daily beach conditions from beaches along the Southwest coast and along the panhandle. Try checking their website before you head out for the day.

Toxic Algae Bloom

Red tide is not the only algae growing in Florida. Two years ago, some Florida waterways and beaches were afflicted by what many described as a green, slimy, rancid- smelling algae. Well…it’s back. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) reports the blue-green algae also known as cyanobacteria, typically develops in nutrient-rich lakes that contain high levels of phosphorous and nitrogen. High temperatures, warm water and abundant sunlight create ideal conditions for the toxic blooms to thrive.

Lake Okeechobee, the Caloosahatchee River and St. Lucie estuary are filled with the toxic algae as it continues to spread to Cape Coral and Ft. Myers. “Just cleaning up the water will not help, points out Buck with GreatFlorida Insurance, Florida’s largest independent boat insurance agency. Both red tide and the blue-green algae are exacerbated by fertilizers and other pollution fed by runoff from the surrounding land.

The blue-green algae can cause skin rashes, nausea, respiratory issues, cramps, diarrhea and vomiting. Long term conditions include; liver, kidney and nervous system damage.

Governor Rick Scott declared a state of emergency this week for seven counties around the lake to give state environmental and tourism agencies more resources to respond to problems caused by the algae. The order also authorizes flushing water south of the lake instead of down the rivers that run to the coasts.

The post Algae Plagues Florida Beaches and Waterways appeared first on The GreatFlorida Insurance Blog.

by GreatFlorida Insurance
7/5/2018

The interior of a parked car in Florida averages 150 degrees, according to researchers at the University of Central Florida.

“Every driver in Florida is familiar with the intense heat that greats you as you open the car door on a hot day,” says Ellsworth Buck, Vice President of GreatFlorida Insurance, Florida’s largest independent car insurance agency. Not only is a hot car terribly uncomfortable, but cooling your car down quickly can keep you from looking like a hot mess before you arrive at your destination.

Engineers at Consumer Reports found the best method for cooling off a hot car as soon as possible. The following are their instructions for how to do it.

“These tips will help you get the most from your air conditioning system while burning less fuel,” says Buck, with GreatFlorida Insurance, Florida’s top independent car insurance agency.

Don’t Pre- Cool

Don’t run the air conditioning in your car until you are ready to drive. The A/C works better when you are driving. Once you are on your way, open the windows and crank the fan to full blast. When cold air starts coming through the vents, close the front windows but keep the rear windows cracked open for another 10 – 20 seconds. This gets cold air to the back of the car and creates an easy path for the hot air to escape the cabin.

Go Low

Adjust the temperature and fan. Setting the temperature to the coldest temperature and adjusting the fans speed keep the air from drying out, making the A/C more efficient saving you some fuel.

Don’t Recirculate

If passengers are in the backseat, turn off recirculation mode. This takes air from the front of the car and pulls it back through the front system keeping the people upfront cool, but leaves the air in the back stale and hot.

Turn Off Start/Stop

Newer cars have an auto start-stop system, turn it off. This feature saves fuel, but it can also keep the air conditioning compressor from running when it shuts the engine off. In very hot weather, you will notice the lack of cool air quickly especially if you are stuck at a lengthy stoplight or in stop and go traffic.

Check the Air Filter

Check your cabin’s air filter to make sure it is clean. A dirty filter prevents air flow.

Automatic Climate Control

If you have automatic climate control in your car, lowering the temperature doesn’t make the car cool off faster. Most systems will do all the temperature and fan adjustments automatically, so you can just set it and forget it.

The post How to Cool Your Car Down Quickly appeared first on The GreatFlorida Insurance Blog.

by GreatFlorida Insurance
6/27/2018

On July 4th people across the country express their American patriotism by celebrating Independence Day.  A quick history refresher- On July 4, 1776, the Declaration of Independence was officially adopted, declaring the 13 colonies liberated from England.

“Independence Day is a festive day to reflect on the privilege of freedom and democracy we enjoy in this country,” said Ellsworth Buck, Vice President of GreatFlorida Insurance, Florida’s largest independent homeowners insurance agency.

Below is some information you might find useful in commemorating this Independence Day.

FIREWORKS- What is legal and what’s not?

The 4th of July is all about fireworks.

In Florida, nothing airborne or exploding is legal including shells and mortars, tube devices, Roman candles, rockets and even firecrackers. Although, you can legally purchase fireworks if you sign a waiver. The waiver states that you will be using the fireworks to scare away birds from agricultural products or fish hatcheries, according to Florida Today. Lying on the form is a first-degree misdemeanor.

Illegally using fireworks is also a first-degree misdemeanor, punishable by up to one year in jail and a $1,000 fine. However, sparklers, snakes and party poppers are legal. Keep in mind, there is still a risk of injury using sparklers. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) reports 8 deaths were caused by fireworks in 2017 along with 12,900 emergency-room related injuries. Sparklers were the number one cause of injuries.

The South Walton Fire District recommends the following guidelines to light it up safely:

Keep a bucket of water close by or a garden hose.

Don’t light anything on dry grass, look for a flat surface.

Never try to re-light a “dud” and light one item at a time.

Do not use unwrapped items or items that may have been tampered with.

Only purchase fireworks from a licensed vendor.

Light up in an open area.

Never allow young children to play or light fireworks.

Keep any part of your body from being directly over a fireworks device when lighting the fuse.

Never carry sparklers in your pocket or shoot them off in metal or glass containers.

DRIVING

More people are killed in car accidents on Independence Day than any other day of the year. “The staggering amount of traffic contributes to that grim statistic, reminds Buck with GreatFlorida Insurance, Florida’s top independent homeowners insurance and car insurance agency.

Along with a high traffic volume, drinking and driving adds to dangerous road conditions. Alcohol also exacerbates dehydration, intensifying the effects of alcohol and causing drowsiness. Distraction from fireworks, is likewise a source of car accidents.

GreatFlorida Insurance is available 24/7 to help with your insurance needs. We offer quality and affordable homowners insurance coverage to Floridians across the state. Call us at 1-888-478-7801 or check us out online at www.greatflorida.com.

The post Make Independence Day unforgettable-in a good way appeared first on The GreatFlorida Insurance Blog.

by GreatFlorida Insurance
6/6/2018

Following the devastation of last year’s hurricane season, lawmakers promised many changes. However, as this year’s storm season begins, only a few changes are on the books.

“After billions in damages, most Floridians were expecting to see more changes this hurricane season,” comments Ellsworth Buck, Vice President of GreatFlorida Insurance.

According to the Associated Press, “The Florida House of Representative’s Select Committee on Hurricane Response and Preparedness issued 78 recommendations over the past year, with 27 being acted upon, mostly as appropriations in the state budget.”

The few substantial changes made include, ensuring nursing homes and assisted living facilities have a supply of generators and three days of fuel. Also, the creation of a disaster preparedness sales tax holiday occurring now through June 7. Certain storm supplies are tax exempt, such as: flashlights, batteries, candles, reusable ice packs, fuel containers, ratchet straps and portable generators.

Preparedness is essential, but understanding risk is also important. “As we head into hurricane season, know your homeowners insurance deductible and limits. You want to be insured for your home’s replacement costs,” reminds Buck of GreatFlorida Insurance.

Most homeowners insurance cover hurricane wind damage, but not flood damage. Flood insurance is separate from your homeowners coverage. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) officials advise everyone with a home in Florida to get flood insurance, despite what a flood map might say.

To improve the publics knowledge of risk, the National Hurricane Center is making improvements in forecasting. New public advisories will better help communicate danger, especially those in an evacuation zone. Adjustments are being made to official hurricane track maps. Experimental wind maps will become official. And advisories will include potential impacts further in advance.

Access to fuel and transportation presented a real problem for those trying to evacuate. In order to ease congestion, a promise to identify larger gas stations along evacuation routes and improved fuel delivery to those areas.

Insurance is designed to help people rebuild their lives. GreatFlorida Insurance can help protect your home with a Florida flood insurance policy provided by the National Flood Insurance Program. We also offer homeowners insurance and rental insurance. Check us out online today.

 

 

 

 

The post Changes this hurricane season appeared first on The GreatFlorida Insurance Blog.

by GreatFlorida Insurance
5/23/2018

A sink hole is growing on the North Lawn of the White House. We will resist the temptation for commentary and jokes.

“Sinkholes are nothing new to Floridians,” says Ellsworth Buck, Vice President of GreatFlorida Insurance, Florida’s largest independent homeowner insurance provider.

However, concerning experts, are the recent heavy rains throughout the state, that may lead to additional sinkholes. Such as the ones in The Villages or the more than a dozen that opened in an Ocala neighborhood earlier this month.

Speaking to a local news agency, Dr. Anthony Randazzo, professor at the University of Florida calls the stretch of land between Tallahassee and I-4 through Central Florida, “sinkhole alley.”

Dr. Randazzo says last year’s Hurricane Irma is responsible for over 400 sinkholes. Recent heavy rainfall is exacerbating the problem.

Sinkholes occur in Florida so often because the peninsula is made up of porous rocks such as limestone or sandstone, which can dissolve over time as they interact with acid naturally occurring in rainwater, according to the Florida Department of Environmental Protection.

So, what happens if a sinkhole develops near or on your property? Florida law requires insurance companies to provide coverage for catastrophic ground cover collapse.

“However, sinkhole damage must meet specific criteria and may not be covered by your homeowner’s insurance policy,” says Buck with GreatFlorida Insurance.  “The law defines sinkhole damage differently from catastrophic ground cover collapse. Sinkhole coverage is available to add to a homeowner’s policy for an additional cost.”

Florida homes do not require inspection for the possibility of sinkholes. Also, most builders do not have them inspected, because of the additional expense. It is impossible to predict when and where the exact location of a sinkhole might develop.

Only a licensed, professional geologist with training in identifying sinkholes, might be able to determine the possibility of sinkhole activity. It is important to keep in mind, not all potential sinkhole activity can be identified.

As a protection to buyers, home sellers are required to disclose when a sinkhole claim was made on a piece of property and the amount that was paid to repair the damages.

You can call the Florida Department of Environmental Protection at 850-245-2118, with a sinkhole question.

The post Heavy Rain Responsible for Sinkholes appeared first on The GreatFlorida Insurance Blog.

by GreatFlorida Insurance
5/16/2018

The 2018 Atlantic Hurricane season begins June 1 and runs through November 30. “Current research proves hurricanes are growing stronger and occurring more frequently,” says Ellsworth Buck, Vice President of GreatFlorida Insurance, Florida’s largest independent auto insurance agency.

Colorado State University predicts a slightly above average Atlantic hurricane season, with 14 named storms, seven hurricanes and three major hurricanes. Whereas, The Weather Channel, is predicting 13 named storms, six hurricanes and two major hurricanes.

While thunderstorms commonly occur in Florida, hail is not as common. It is a type of frozen precipitation that occurs within strong to severe storms any time of the year. Hail causes approximately $1 billion in property damage annually nationwide.

Hail can dent your automobile’s hood, trunk and doors. It can break and crack mirrors and windows and cause damaged or stuck doorjambs.

“It is really tempting to observe the novelty of anything frozen falling from the sky but hail can be dangerous, especially if it is sizable,” reminds Ellsworth Buck, Vice President of GreatFlorida Insurance, Florida’s top independent auto insurance agency.

If you are out driving when a hailstorm hits, don’t panic. Below are tips to stay safe on the road.

Slow down and be aware of other drivers around you who make not know how to react when driving in a hailstorm.

Create distance between you and the driver ahead of you.

Safely, get off the road. The impact of hail is greater on a moving object, so your car is at greater risk of damage when it is moving forward.

Look for coverage close by such as a gas station awning or garage.  Avoid trees, falling branches can cause more damage.

If you stop under a bridge or overpass be sure to pull completely out of traffic lanes and onto the shoulder.

Do not leave your car.

Try and keep your car at an angle so hail hits it from the front. Windshields are reinforced to withstand pelting objects. Side windows and back glass are not, they are much more vulnerable to shatter or break.

If the hail is severe, cover your eyes or the eyes of any passengers with a blanket. Get face down in the backseat or floor, face away from any windows.

Stay clear of culverts or ditches that quickly fill with water.

Most comprehensive auto insurance policies will cover hail damage. Once the hail damage is accessed, work with your insurance agent to file a claim and get your car into an auto body shop to repair any dents or other damage caused by the storm.

The post Protect Your Car from Hail Damage This Storm Season appeared first on The GreatFlorida Insurance Blog.

by GreatFlorida Insurance
5/9/2018

Hawaiian lawmakers recently passed a bill prohibiting the sale of sunscreen containing chemicals known to harm coral reefs.

“Once signed by governor David Ige, it will be the first law of its kind,” says Ellsworth Buck, Vice President of GreatForida Insurance, Florida’s largest independent boat insurance agency.

The chemicals contributing to the destruction of coral reefs and other ocean wildlife are oxybenzone and octinoxate. These are common ingredients found in over 3,500 popular sunscreens such as Coppertone, Hawaiian Tropic and Banana Boat.

Oxybenzone and octinoxate are chemicals that filter and absorb UV light, blocking out the sun’s radiation and extending the amount of time a person can spend in the sun. However, like most topical products, they wash off in the water causing damage to coral and fish. According to coral reef advocates, Be Reef Safe, 4,000 to 6,000 tons of sunscreen end up on coral reefs every year.

A 2015 study conducted by a group of scientists of coral reefs in Hawaii, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Israel found oxybenzone and octinoxate leach nutrients from coral, bleach it white and reduce its resiliency. The chemicals are known endocrine disrupters, even a tiny amount can damage coral.

“The largest coral reef in the continental U.S. is the Florida Reef, found in the Keys,” reminds Ellsworth Buck, Vice President of GreatForida Insurance, Florida’s top independent boat insurance agency.

It is the third largest barrier reef ecosystem in the world. It too is being threatened by using these chemicals. In order to protect the future of Florida’s reef tract a similar bill could be passed in Florida. As the public becomes aware of the threat these chemicals pose to coral reef and underwater wildlife, it could prompt action to preserve our beloved reef.

Best thing to do now is read sunscreen labels and avoid oxybenzone and octinoxate. There other ingredients available in sunscreens that can effectively protect your skin. Most importantly, cover up. Sunscreen, should be the last line of defense.

The post Could Florida Ban Sunscreen? appeared first on The GreatFlorida Insurance Blog.